Posted in: Android, Battery tests, Featured, Mobile phones

HTC One X for AT&T battery test is over, see if it outperforms its quad-core sibling

As most of you probably know by now, the HTC One X for AT&T packs a different chipset than its NVIDIA Tegra 3 rocking, global sibling. A Qualcomm made, Snapdragon S4 chipset with two CPU cores is the reason for the US available HTC One X’s LTE connectivity.

This means that testing out the battery life of the two HTC One X versions is the perfect showdown of the battery efficiency, which the latest and greatest Qualcomm and NVIDIA chipsets offer. Read on to find out which one came on top.

As always, we’ll kick things off with a look at the talk time of the handset. The HTC One X for AT&T managed the highly impressive 10 hours and 35 minutes before its battery gave up – a result which is better than the showing of the quad-core packing global version, though not by much – the difference is around 5%.


Talk time

  • Motorola DROID RAZR MAXX
    20:24
  • Samsung Galaxy Note
    12:14
  • Samsung Wave 3 S8600
    11:07
  • HTC One X (AT&T, LTE)
    10:35
  • Samsung I9300 Galaxy S III
    10:20
  • HTC One V
    10:00
  • HTC One X
    9:57
  • HTC One S
    9:42
  • Samsung I9103 Galaxy R
    9:40
  • HTC Sensation XL
    9:30
  • Nokia Lumia 710
    9:05
  • HTC Vivid
    9:02
  • HTC Rhyme
    8:48
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia neo V
    8:41
  • Meizu MX
    8:39
  • Samsung Galaxy S II
    8:35
  • Nokia Lumia 800
    8:25
  • Samsung Galaxy Nexus
    8:23
  • Samsung Captivate Glide
    8:20
  • HTC Rezound (LTE)
    8:10
  • Samsung Galaxy Note (LTE)
    8:02
  • Apple iPhone 4S
    7:41
  • Samsung Galaxy S Blaze 4G
    7:14
  • Samsung i937 Focus S
    7:25
  • Samsung Rugby Smart I847
    7:09
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Pro
    6:57
  • Nokia N9
    6:57
  • HTC Radar
    6:53
  • BlackBerry Curve 9380
    6:52
  • Nokia Lumia 900 for AT&T (LTE)
    5:53
  • LG Nitro HD (LTE)
    5:16
  • HTC Titan II (LTE)
    5:10
  • BlackBerry Bold 9790
    5:00
  • Pantech Burst
    4:46

The web browsing time showed a similar state of affairs. The Qualcomm equipped HTC One X outdid its NVIDIA packing sibling again, this time by about 15%. We will remind you again that despite its dual-core nature, the One X for AT&T is not slower than the global version, as its chipset features a newer architecture.

Web browsing

  • Motorola DROID RAZR MAXX
    7:23
  • HTC Radar
    7:17
  • Apple iPhone 4S
    6:56
  • HTC One V
    6:49
  • BlackBerry Curve 9380
    6:40
  • Samsung i937 Focus S
    6:15
  • Samsung Rugby Smart I847
    5:53
  • Pantech Burst
    5:51
  • Samsung Galaxy S Blaze 4G
    5:45
  • Samsung Wave 3 S8600
    5:34
  • Samsung Captivate Glide
    5:33
  • Samsung Galaxy Note LTE
    5:24
  • HTC Sensation XL
    5:20
  • Samsung I9300 Galaxy S III
    5:17
  • HTC Rezound
    5:16
  • HTC Rhyme
    5:08
  • Samsung I9103 Galaxy R
    5:07
  • HTC One X (AT&T)
    5:03
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Pro
    4:50
  • HTC Vivid
    4:46
  • Meizu MX
    4:35
  • Nokia N9
    4:33
  • Samsung Galaxy S II
    4:24
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia neo V
    4:20
  • HTC One X
    4:18
  • Nokia Lumia 900 for AT&T
    4:10
  • Nokia Lumia 800
    4:07
  • HTC Titan II (LTE)
    4:05
  • HTC One S
    4:03
  • BlackBerry Bold 9790
    4:02
  • LG Nitro HD
    4:00
  • Nokia Lumia 710
    3:51
  • Samsung Galaxy Note
    3:35
  • Samsung Galaxy Nexus
    3:01

Video playback time was no different. With a time of 6 hours and 26 minutes, the HTC One X for AT&T once again bested the global HTC One X, and it’s again by a margin of about 15%. The result from both phones are not stellar to begin with, but keep in mind that those 1800mAh batteries power 4.7″ screens with HD resolution.

Video playback

  • Motorola DROID RAZR MAXX
    14:17
  • Samsung I9300 Galaxy S III
    10:01
  • Samsung Rugby Smart I847
    9:34
  • HTC One S
    9:28
  • Apple iPhone 4S
    9:24
  • Nokia N9
    8:40
  • Samsung Galaxy Note
    8:25
  • Samsung Galaxy S II
    8:00
  • Samsung i937 Focus S
    7:55
  • Samsung Wave 3 S8600
    7:52
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia neo V
    7:45
  • Samsung Galaxy S Blaze 4G 7:33
  • Samsung Galaxy Note LTE
    7:30
  • HTC One X (AT&T)
    6:26
  • Samsung I9103 Galaxy R
    6:21
  • HTC Sensation XL
    6:12
  • Samsung Captivate Glide
    6:04
  • Samsung Galaxy Nexus
    6:02
  • HTC Vivid
    6:00
  • HTC Radar
    5:54
  • Nokia Lumia 800
    5:52
  • HTC Titan II
    5:50
  • BlackBerry Bold 9790
    5:47
  • HTC One X
    5:45
  • Sony Ericsson Xperia Pro
    5:44
  • Pantech Burst
    5:38
  • Meizu MX
    5:27
  • HTC Rhyme
    5:23
  • HTC One V
    5:20
  • Nokia Lumia 900 for AT&T
    5:18
  • BlackBerry Curve 9380
    5:09
  • HTC Rezound
    5:03
  • LG Nitro HD
    4:17
  • Nokia Lumia 710
    3:27

The total endurance rating of the HTC One X for AT&T was 42 hours. This means that the device will last a tad less than two days if you use it for an hour each of telephony, web browsing, and video playback every day – not bad for a power-hungry top-of-the-range Android smartphone.

In a nutshell, the HTC One X for AT&T is powerful and power efficient. Qualcomm’s latest Snapdragon S4 chipset is a massive improvement over its predecessor in terms of energy efficiency. With the LTE radio being an integral part of chipset, rather than an addition, it shows that 4G data speeds shouldn’t come at the expense of the battery performance anymore.

Share:

Comments

Rules for posting